This, and other thoughts

I want to be successful enough one day that kids take one look at my house on Halloween and know they’re getting the big ass candy bars.

But let’s be real though, that kid from Billie Jean was totally his son.

UGH why are minutes on the dryer so much longer than regular minutes, you said 6 minutes left a half hour ago what kind of weird as space-time continuum do you operate on, dryer??

meltingpenguins:

thetrekkiehasthephonebox:

I like the idea of taking every woman joke from the last season, and turning them into Moffat jokes.

do it, seriously, do it.

Maybe that way moffat-fans will finally notice what a crap their idol is doing.

because really, easy formula ‘replace ‘woman/girl/any term referring to a female character, cis or otherwise’ with ‘Moffat’. If his fans are outraged how mean you are to him, congrats, the origina ‘joke’ was an unfunny  sexist/transphobic piece of crap’

saydolly:

Aziz Ansari is like the king of callouts.

too-fan-to-function:

What an inspiration

monsterfoundry:

This is the best thing ever.

sneakyfeets:

chapmen:

literally wtf the fuck

I DON’T USE THE WORD WIZARD LIGHTLY BUT

khaleesibeyonce:

LOL YES.

While I totally agree with the sentiment, remember this:
When you’re writing about dragons and elves, there’s really no such thing as being inaccurate because they aren’t real; you can’t offend a dragon or write a dragon wrong because there IS no wrong. Whatever kind of dragon you write, that’s just what a dragon is in your story. Writing diversity into fiction in a skillful way requires a much more complex understanding of who you are writing about because you are likely at least basing them on a real group.
However, that being said, they should do it anyway. It’s worth the extra effort, because it makes a more realistic world. A world with only white people is boring and so unrealistic as to stretch the imagination beyond what it takes to believe in dragons.

khaleesibeyonce:

LOL YES.

While I totally agree with the sentiment, remember this:

When you’re writing about dragons and elves, there’s really no such thing as being inaccurate because they aren’t real; you can’t offend a dragon or write a dragon wrong because there IS no wrong. Whatever kind of dragon you write, that’s just what a dragon is in your story. Writing diversity into fiction in a skillful way requires a much more complex understanding of who you are writing about because you are likely at least basing them on a real group.

However, that being said, they should do it anyway. It’s worth the extra effort, because it makes a more realistic world. A world with only white people is boring and so unrealistic as to stretch the imagination beyond what it takes to believe in dragons.